Health and Family Security

Issue Spotlight: Healthy PA Is 'Bad Medicine'

Governor Corbett's Healthy PA plan threatens to undermine the stability of community health centers and services for Pennsylvania's most vulnerable, writes Dr. Hilda Shirk, the chief executive officer of SouthEast Lancaster Health Services.

Learn More: Read Dr. Shirk's Commentary

Comments: Read PBPC's Comments on the Healthy PA Plan

Summary: Governor's Healthy PA Plan

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February 1, 2016 (Harrisburg, Pa.) –  In the context of Pennsylvania’s still-unfinished 2015-16 state budget, the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center (PBPC) today released a detailed analysis of three competing budget proposals put forward last year – the governor’s original 2015-16 proposal, the compromise budget, SB 1073, and the Republican bill, HB 1460, that passed both chambers and the governor blue-line vetoed in December.

Budget numbers are always difficult to understand, not least because those with different perspectives can present the numbers in sharply different, but honest ways. In the context of the state’s still-unfinished 2105-16 budget, this brief presents a series of careful “apples-to-apples” comparisons of the three budgets in play in Harrisburg last year: Governor Wolf’s budget proposal, the Republican budget and the bi-partisan budget agreed to by Governor Wolf and the leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties in the General Assembly.

HARRISBURG, Pa. (Dec. 19, 2015) – Marc Stier, Director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, made the following statement in response to the failure of the pension reform bill in the state House of Representatives and Majority Leader Dave Reed’s announcement that the House will vote tomorrow on a stop gap budget.

As of December 10, 2015, the 2015-16 Pennsylvania Budget is still not done. Two different budgets are now before the General Assembly. In this brief, we provide an overview of the differences between the two budgets, looking first at critical differences in spending for education and human services, then at the impact of those differences, and finally at some subtleties in how the two budgets organize  and present certain spending choices they have in common and how this affects the bottom line budget numbers

The Wolf budget would pump $4 million more into intellectual disability community base funds used by counties to meet crisis needs (e.g., the death of a caregiving parent) and $137 million more into community waiver funds to reduce the long emergency services waiting list in Pennsylvania for people with intellectual disabilities.

March 25, 2015

PBPC hosted its annual Pennsylvania Budget Summit in Harrisburg, providing an in-depth look at the state and federal budget plans and what they mean for communities and families across Pennsylvania. Check out online resources from the Summit.

HARRISBURG, Pa. (Feb. 18, 2015) – The Better Choices for Pennsylvania Coalition released today a list of 19 recommendations to make Pennsylvania’s tax system fairer. State and local taxes require low- and middle-income workers to pay more of their income in taxes than the highest-income Pennsylvanians, making it hard to raise sufficient funds for public schools, higher education, health care and other vital services.

December 16, 2014

Summary and PowerPoint presentation from the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center's "The Road Ahead in PA: 2015 Economic & Budget Outlook" Luncheon in Harrisburg.

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